Q&A with Center of Excellence Recovery Specialist

What follows is a Q&A with Recovery Specialist Janice Olson from Gateway Rehab’s Opioid Use Disorder Center of Excellence (COE). One of 50 recognized Centers of Excellence in Pennsylvania, Gateway Rehab treats those suffering from opioid use disorder and provides specialized and coordinated care for individuals with Medicaid.

 

What is a Center of Excellence?

Gateway Rehab’s COE is administered through its Care Coordination Program, which helps to ensure that people with opioid-related substance use disorders have access to treatment and may receive follow-up care and support from their communities. The Care Coordination team puts comprehensive recovery plans into action for people who are uninsured or receiving Medicaid. Care is team-based and “whole person” focused, with the explicit goal of integrating behavioral health and primary care.

Who is eligible and what services can be expected?

Anyone who is diagnosed with an opioid use disorder and is uninsured or receiving medical assistance. A person does not have to be receiving treatment from Gateway Rehab.

Along with comprehensive care management and coordination, a person will receive transitional, follow-up care for one year, family support, referral to community and social support services, and, peer-to-peer support from certified recovery specialists.

What is a certified recovery specialist?

Certified recovery specialists (CRS) are individuals who have completed specialized addiction training from a state accredited school or institute, and who have passed the state examination for certification. We are in long-term recovery and work with drug and alcohol patients on a peer-to-peer basis. The primary function of the CRS is to help individuals gain access to needed resources in the community by assisting them in overcoming barriers and bridging gaps between their needs and available resources. As a CRS, I use unique insights gained from my own personal recovery experience, plus skills and knowledge learned from earning my state certification. As such, I meet my patients where they’re at; I have a sense for what they’re going through and can help empower them to make better, healthier decisions.

What does a CRS do?

Once enrolled into the COE, an evaluation of needs is completed for each patient. I then help them prioritize their needs based on what needs immediate attention. Usually, a patient’s immediate need is for treatment and housing, but we also help them connect with a primary care physician, mental health providers, and other substance use disorder treatment providers.

If a person is ready for treatment, I review the options for treatment with them and, upon completing treatment, I help them make a decision about transitional housing that will support their recovery, such as a half-way house, three-quarter house, and or other appropriate housing.

How else can a CRS help?

There are times when a patient has never been to a 12-step meeting before and taking them to their first meeting helps to break the nervousness or stigma about 12-step fellowships. I do want to stress, though, that a CRS is not a 12-step fellowship sponsor. A CRS helps a patient overcome barriers and bridge gaps between their needs and available resources within the community. For instance, many of my patients don’t have a vehicle or a driver’s license and need help with transportation. I can help them sign up for travelers’ aid and also help them get to know the bussing system within their community. Also, some of my patients have criminal charges pending stemming from their drug use. I may go with patients to their legal hearings and advocate for them … helping to break the stigma.

How often do you meet with patients?

We will meet with our patients at least once a month for a face-to-face to see how they are doing and help them connect with any resources that they may need; however, we’re always just a phone call away.

We also are responsible for obtaining monthly drug screens from our patients and, if a patient does prove positive for any drugs, we will help them seek treatment if they are receptive to receiving treatment. We always want to let our patients know that if they are not ready for treatment, that we are still here to support them until they are. It’s asking the question, “what can we do to help you now?” It’s important to remember that not everyone’s recovery process is the same and we support any path our patients choose. Our goal for our patients is for them to achieve full and lasting recovery, however they may accomplish this.

How can a person enroll in the Gateway Rehab Center of Excellence?

It’s easy. A person simply has to pick up the phone, call 800-472-1177, ext. 1191, and express their interest. That’s it. We realize that sometimes picking up the phone and calling someone for help may be difficult, but, we’re here to help and assist those that may feel hopeless, helpless, and don’t know where else to turn.

 

Our next blog post will feature a Q&A with a Gateway Rehab COE patient.